Looking after your garden in the snow

Hopefully, you will have taken steps to prevent any damage to your plants before the frost and snow arrives - if you wake up one day to an unexpected blanket of snow, there are some steps you can take. 

Snow is good news for some plants and bad news for others. Snow protects perennial plants that have retreated underground from the cold - bulbs like the snow too. 

If you have conifers or hedges in your garden, these can become misshapen from the weight of the snow. Bind them up with garden canes and some twine if possible and leave until the weather improves to try and reshape them.

Evergreens can cope with fine powdery snow but don't like the weight of wet snow once it starts thawing - try to knock snow off as soon as it arrives. 

Your greenhouse roof may suffer from snow - the weight of it building up can crack panes, plus it blocks light from getting in. If its safe to do so, try brushing the snow off the rood to let in some light and stop the frames from bending.

If you have fruit cages in the garden of allotment, you should have ideally removed the nets in late autumn. If the nets are still on there, shake off any accumulated snow and store them to avoid any damage or mishaping of the frame.

If you have plants in pots outside, make sure they are wrapped with a good quality horticultural frost fleece. 

Most of all though, keep yourself safe and healthy when it's cold outside - we highly recommend cosying up in front of the fire with a cup of tea, biscuits and seed catalogues! 

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